Tips and Tricks

How Big is 2 Big? A Guide to 2 Carat Diamonds

So how big is 2 carats?

When you think of a “big” carat ring, you usually have an image in your mind’s eye come up of a celebrity with a rock bigger than a grape (yes - in fruit terms that’s small, diamond terms that’s MASSIVE).

While 2 carats is going to be a looker, it is definitely not even close to those mega-sparklers. However, even if you don’t have the ultra-huge bling-ring, you may think that 2 carats is still too big. So, lets dive in to what makes a good 2 carat diamond ring, and what to consider when choosing one.

The Low Down on a 2 Carat

At 2 carats you're certainly not skimping on weight. This doesn’t mean that this is out of the ordinary for rings, half of all US engagement rings fall between 1 to 2 carats. A lot of times people go off of their finger size to determine how big or small of a stone they should get. But there is a lot more that goes into the visual (size) appearance of the stone that goes beyond just the number of carats. Granted, the heavier carat weight equals a larger stone, but depending on the cut/shape of some diamonds that can look bigger or smaller.

Some cuts such as a pear (teardrop) or emerald (rectangle) are going to look larger on your finger because of their elongated shapes. A princess (sharp-cornered square) or cushion (soft-cornered square) are going to look slightly larger, but not as much as the more rounded fancy shapes. And finally, a round brilliant is probably going to look the most average out of all the cuts we've gone over, but will have the most sparkle.

What does 2 carats mean?

So in regards to carats (not the crunchy veggies) it is the weight of the cut diamond. This does not always exactly correlate to the size of the diamond. This is due to the depth percentage. Usually, there are a set of recommendations for good and balanced cuts. Sometimes this doesn’t even out and the stone may have a deeper pavilion (the bottom half) so the weight is disguised. This means you’ll be paying for a diamond that doesn’t look as large as the hole in your wallet. So it’s important to find a stone that is well cut.

Larger Diamond, Easier to Spot Inclusions

The best part of a diamond and what makes it so different than any other gem is the brilliance, fire and scintillon. Those are the fancy words we use in the biz to describe those beautiful flashes of color you see inside the diamond when the light moves. And with a larger carat diamond this means you have more of an opportunity to see more of them. However, this also means there’s more room for inclusions to be seen. Inclusions are tiny to very noticeable specks of carbon or other organic materials (sometimes even baby diamond crystals) that got stuck in the diamond while it was forming all those thousands of years ago. The bigger the diamond, the larger the table (flat see-through part on top) and the easier it is to see imperfections. This will take away from the beauty and impressiveness. A 2 carat diamond with a big black spot that you just can’t look away from isn’t why we want people staring! We want our bling (internally) clean!

Carbon spots (1).jpg

iclusions.jpg These are all 2 carat weight SI2 diamonds

RB (1).jpg

And here's the same weight but VVS grade. Big difference!

What to Look For

With a diamond of this size, you have to make sure that you focus on finding one that is eye-clean, not just the grandeur of finding a big stone. Along with color and cut, there's a clarity grading system for inclusions too. This helps us to understand what's inside the diamond and not get swept away with first glance beauty. It ranges from IF (internally flawless - best of the best) to SI (slightly included - good runner up) to I3 (Included - not always the best), with a few others in-between.

Setting Options

When it comes to size of a 2 carat diamond, something that really comes into play on how big it looks to the eye is the accent stones and band choice (or lack-there-of). If you think the stone looks pretty large on your finger already, then a minimalist plain-Jane gold or platinum band can let the gem get all the attention and allow it to stand out all on its own. A diamond this size was made for this, a classic no-fuss solitaire setting is timeless, impressive and cost-effective (since the diamond is going cost you a pretty penny, you can save a little bit this way).

emerald solitaire.jpg

If you’re not shy about the visual size of your rock, then a bedazzled diamond halo is what you are looking for. This will accent the diamond and really add even more sparkle and bling to it. It's going to showcase the diamond and turn some heads. Think of these extra diamonds as your stones back-up singers, they are there not to get the credit but to make that center stone stand out and shine its brightest. halo.jpg

If you want to add some more sparkle but don’t want a bunch of band accent stones to add to avoid the extra weight, width and glitz, consider a high setting and add some peek-a-boo diamonds under the girdle. These stones are secretly set right under the girdle of the diamond (where the stone meets the band). You know when you compliment a girl’s dress, and she says “it has pockets!” and throws her hands into them and spins around to prove to you they are there? That excitement is what you'll be feeling too with surprise stones. You’ll know the secret and want to show everyone who looks at it.

hidden halo.jpg

If you really want a statement ring that will blow everyone away, add stones to the band or even add stacking bands full of bling. If you choose to add accent stones to the band (or bands, look at you flashy queen!). Keep in mind, the larger the accent stones, the thicker and heavier the band. While you want the bands to match the impressiveness of your 2 carat diamond, you still want to be comfortable wearing it if is an everyday ring. side stones.jpg blingy band.jpg 3-stone.jpg

So what's the verdict here? Is 2 carats really that big?

While it is definitely above average, it's not all that uncommon, or difficult to make that size work on your finger. If you have thinner fingers, try an elongated shape such as a pear or oval, and maybe some pave diamonds to the band. Too much bling and your finger will get too crowded. Thicker fingers, try a round brilliant and add a halo or larger cut diamonds on the band to help fill in some of the extra space. Whether short or long, thin or thick, there's a cut and band style to fit you. Don’t worry about how big the carat is, find the diamond that you love and fits your personality.

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